?

Log in

No account? Create an account
entries friends calendar profile adric.net Previous Previous Next Next
Everyone's looking for Yellowcake, it seems .. - nil.enroll(aetheric_username, quantum_class_id)
yljatlhQo'! QIch lo'laltbebej!
adric
adric
Everyone's looking for Yellowcake, it seems ..

So perhaps I had a slight fever this morning. Maybe it was just the reading material. After I gave up on the kitten and lay down to read for a couple hours, I felt quite warm in the face. I checked the thermometer (24.5 ° C) and rolled back over to read a bit more. Later, after I had given up on the book and was laying in the dark, I still felt quite warm, and so I got up and splashed some water on my face and then sat in the living room for awhile (which is always cooler at night because of the windows). After a few moments in there I got back on my my feet and went back to bed. The temp in my bedroom was then 24.0, but I still felt warm, as the water beaded off of my face.

I lay in the dark, and found myself easily slipping conciously into the dream I had had the previous morning. Picking up the narrative where it had dropped off, I began to tell the the story in my head, in prose, with first-person narration. After quite a bit of this (several pages of prose ?) I turned again and somehow fell asleep.

When I woke up again to mutter at someone who came in to ask me something, I was on the other end of the bed, and under the blankets. Also, when I left the room half an hour ago it was 23.0 ° C in there, but it seemed fine to me, getting out from under blankets and walking up the hall.

Of course it could just be that my brain was being steamed in it's own juices from having read, and somewhat followed a few chapters of Umberto Eco, Foucault's Pendulum. Everyone in the book (save perhaps a minor functionary or two) is stark raving mad. The protaganists work for a small publishing company which receives unsolicited crackpot papers and books on every imaginable occult and enigmatic subject. Tiring of this after years of it, they try a thought exercise (the Plan) in which they use the new wordprocessor (an IBM-compatible PC), it's BASIC interpreter, and their wits to try and construct a believable story out of all of it. And I do mean all of it : Knights of the Temple, Crusades, Nostradamus, various heresies, Masons, anagrams, Popes, Druids, Celts, Moors, Saracens, the Grail, the many names of God, nuclear weapons proliferation, and of the course the cabbala (sp). And the seem to have succeeded doubly in their thought experiment, or so it seems where I've read: They conceived of a Plan which explains it all in their madness ... and someone believes them.

As if the story itself weren't so, well, arcane and occult, the book itself is a difficult read. This English translation of the Italian original seems to have kept the author's teeming multilingual vocabulary intact. Which is to say that most of the Italian is made into English, but the Latin, French, German, Hebrew, and Cabbala texts and quotes remain intact. The book opens with a diagram I know to be The Tree of Life, and the sections are named after it's Sephiroth (?). The quotes at the beginnings of the chapters are rarely translated, and in fact the first chapter starts with a paragraph of Hebrew script. Madness, indeed.

Greek Fest was fun, if annoying around the edges personally. The lamb I had was quite tasty, and I doubt it has anything to do with my troubles this morning. One minor annoyance was the additional level of token exchange: most food and drink are bought with tickets, which you exchange local currency for towards the front of the fest. The other more personal annoyance was that although I ran into an old friend (and her apprentices) I still didn't have a chance to talk to her. It has been years, several of them, and I'm am afraid I was a little too insistent when I reminded her of this, on my way out of the concert area. Oh and the music was wonderful, of course.

Errands. Must run errrands. Later: Cleaned up copy a bit, gave it a title. Errands ran long but I got some widgets need for the test network, and played around with a PowerMac 9500/200/128M/2.0G (System 9.1) at some length. Oh and they bought lunch and dinner.

Current Mood: awake awake

2 comments or Leave a comment
Comments
taser From: taser Date: October 11th, 2003 01:25 pm (UTC) (Link)
"Foucault's Pendulum" is an interesting read; it does lose a lot from the Italian, though.

If you feel that you can deal with another dose of literary weirdness, try "The Crying of Lot 49", by Thomas Pynchon. Most of his work is very difficult to deal with (I couldn't get past the first few chapters of "Gravity's Rainbow"), but this is actually his most accessible book.
adric From: adric Date: October 11th, 2003 10:57 pm (UTC) (Link)
The first few chapters of Gravity's Rainbow kicked my ass, too. So hard I gave up and can't recall where the paperback is. I may have given it away.

I'm not likely to read the Italian version anytime soon, and this is my first Eco. I need to read Rose, of which I have only seen the movie.

The only other things I can think of as twisted as this and still serious (thereby leaving out Robert Anson Wilson) is The Magus by John Fowlkes (sp?). It's quite the roller coaster ride. Actually it's a lot more fun, interesting, and twisty than roller coasters, which I don't like (making my choice of analogy weak indeed).

I'm going to go copy edit that post now. It's sloppy, even for me.
2 comments or Leave a comment