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Advertising Analysis - nil.enroll(aetheric_username, quantum_class_id)
yljatlhQo'! QIch lo'laltbebej!
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Advertising Analysis

Orthography:

Citibank: A cardboard magazine advertisement in July 2004 GQ (p 21) features a mostly blank bumper sticker preprinted with "I [heart]". The accompanying text, in the right column and on the rear of the page, suggests that 'Citi' can help you to get and keep whatever it is that you love. It ends (front) with "Enjoy writing your own statement this month," a pun on the common cliche of receiving a bank statement. The ad copy on the back gives many suggestions for the use of the bumper sticker, even including sample illustrations. The whole ad seems to use strategies of social engagement to encourage the idea that the multinational banking conglomerate is your ally in your life's goals. Several popular hobbies are used on the chance that readers share the hobby and thus feel more engaged. The publication is targeted at young professional men who, the advertiser hopes, have sufficient disposable income to invest.

Mazda: A one page ad in the June 2004 (p 51) features a picture of their new car model which covers 80% of the page from the top. The title across the top of the photograph is "DELAY GRATIFICATION. The All-New Mazda 3". The photograph looks like it has been torn, and a piece, the word "DELAY", is shifted slightly up and to the left. Also, in the bottom right of the photograph the servicemark "zoom - zoom" is printed, and the font is blurred to create the idea that the text is moving rapidly. The quite noticably smaller text paragraph under the picture begins with "Rethink What's Possible" in bold. The text argues that the reader does not have to wait to buy a new car (as they must have been planning) and an "upgrade" now. A discussion of available options to add concludes the paragraph with "the best part is what we've added: the immediate gratification ...[of]... driving a Mazda." The whole ad seems designed to appeal to the consumer's desire for a new car, which has been temporarily overwhelmed by "delayed gratification." The consumer has typically borrowed money to purchase a car, and is not yet prepared to buy another. The advertiser wishes to introduce the new model to the consumer while trying to combat their reluctance to make such a large purchasing decision. It is understood that the readership of this magazine can afford to purchase a $16,895 USD automobile, and the advertiser merely wishes to encourage the reader to buy sooner rather than later by playing on the difference between delayed and instant gratification, although 'instant' is not used in the ad.

Double meaning

Korbel, blue nile, Norwegian Cruise Line: A picture of a man and woman on the beach laughing and holding champagne glasses is titled "From Popping The Question To Popping The Cork". This joint ad in the June 2004 GQ (p 157) plays on the similar cliches of proposing marriage and uncorking wine. The advertisers wish to associate their product with happy moments and specifically with a succesful proposal of marriage. Further, it is argued that the products will ensure a favourable reply to "the question" being popped. Text at the bottom of the ad makes this clear. The magazine is targeted at professional young men, who it is assumed want nothing more than to find a beautiful woman to marry.

Canon: In this advertisement in the July 2004 GQ (p 51), a title in large print declares that the new camera "The Digital Rebel" is "Turning the world of photography on its ear". Below the title is a sequence of four photographs of an American football player being turned on his head. This play on the cliche meaning to upset or discomfort versus literally upending is used to try and empasize the 'revolutionary' nature of the product. The continued reference to revolution is also double meaning as they are not referring to political actions or change of government. All of this is supposed to encourage the belief that the product is different from other products by its and other manufacturers, and to sneak in the endorsement of the product by a sports league, the NFL.

Assonance:

Subway: This from the July 2004 GQ has an illustration of a strongman lifting two baby tomatoes. Beneath that is the text "Good for yor muscles, as well as your mojo" and the paragraph of text that follows begins "The healthier you are, the happier you feel." The repetition of beginning sounds serves to associate related postive health concepts with each other and with the pictured salads below. The ad argues that eating the product will grant the consumer all of these positive health concepts. The readership of the magazine is assumed to be concerned with "eating well" and having good *mojo. (I do not think this word is used correctly).

Dramatic words:

Infiniti: A two page advertisment in the July 2004 GQ has words on the left page and a photo of a car on the facing page. The first page is full of words printed large, all lowercase, in light gray on a white background without punctuation. All of the words are representative of schools of art, such as "minimalism" and "art deco." The ad presents the car as a work of art "on exhibit" at their WWW site. An association of a product with a work of art is a common way of attaching value to a product as art pieces are thought of as rare, valuable and desireable. Also, the idea of uniqueness of the product is encouraged as art is often one of a kind. As with many ads in this publication targeted at young professionals, the question is not the affordability or value of the product as it's attractiveness and the statement purchasing it would make to peers.

Backfire?

Citibanks advertisment 'backfires' in a number of ways. Their symbol othography of a heart seems, well silly, and does not encourage my belief that they would be a trustworthy place to keep money. Further, this full page cardboard ad and sticker must have been tremendously expensive, and such expenditures by a bank seem counter to their supposed purpose of providing financial security to clients. The slogan "Live Richly" is also a complete 'turnoff' as I am not rich, nor do I see it as a possible occurance. It is notable that I am not in the target demographic of this ad, and that I received these magazines in error.

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